Great Pages: UNCANNY X-MEN #132

When Wolverine debuted in 1974, he wasn’t the unstoppable force of nature that future stories would present him to be. True, he had claws and could heal quickly, but he didn’t quite have that killer instinct. Wolverine talked a big game but hadn’t had the opportunity to really back it up. In 1980, he would finally get his chance to prove himself to readers.

In the middle of Chris Claremont and John Byrne’s Dark Phoenix Saga, the X-Men had all been captured by the Hellfire Club. Wolverine, thought to be dead, had been dumped into the sewers. Although Uncanny X-Men #133 featured Wolverine stalking his way back inside the Hellfire Club, taking out many of the Club’s bodyguards along the way, it was the final page of #132 that was most memorable. Wolverine, though battered and hurting, began to unleash his rage. This moment helped make Wolverine a true fan favorite and propelled his stories for the next 30 years.

From Uncanny X-Men (Vol. 1) #132 (1980)

Comments

  1. Mickey Mickey (@GeeksOfChrist) says:

    John Byrne used to be SHARP!

  2. Couldn’t agree more. One of my favourite panels of the initial Claremont run and a defining moment for Wolvie.

  3. billbittner says:

    I remember this moment distinctly. It took X-Men issue 126 (In Search of Mutant X / Proteus) to make me fall in love with the X-Men. But it was this page that made me fall in love with Wolvie.

  4. This is probably my favorite page of all time. I first read it in an issue of Classic X-Men in the late ’80s or early ’90s and it was the first comic book page that really blew my mind. I think the first paragraph is right on the money, this page was a real turning point for Wolverine in his transition to an A-list character.

  5. RobotZombie RobotZombie says:

    Sums up everything awesome about Wolverine

  6. Rusty Piton Rusty Piton says:

    I love the previous page too with Wolverine getting smashed through like seven stories and into the sewer.

  7. I love this because it is the period where Wolverine became HUGE….But the fact that Wolverine had to go it alone next issue was a big deal. Now a days he could probably decimate an entire country by himself. But going after a bunch of telepaths and their bodyguards? Big deal.

  8. Jesse1125 Jesse1125 says:

    Iconic, love the gleaming claws!! Byrne at the top of his game.
    ‘NUFF SAID (loosely translates to “Sh**’s about to get REAL!!”)

  9. OliverTwist OliverTwist says:

    This story and art is what made me a life time comic enthusiast. This should be a monthly article, Jeff you presented a good idea.

  10. I don’t like the Claremont/Bryne-Cockrum era to the same extent everyone else does. I always believed Claremont’s craft got better as he went along, his verbosity dialed down a bit, and his stories stronger in their themes and ideas(the Genosha 4-parter is maybe the best thing Claremont has ever written).

    But I do love this page. Not just for it’s iconic status, but it’s structure. Up top, there’s the Hellfire Club, above us all in their decadence and deviousness, declaring divine devotion to the Black Queen. Our eyes dart down, down, down beneath the surface to Wolverine, a man hated and feared by the world, betrayed by his teammate, covered with filth. He is as down as you can get. But it doesn’t matter. Wolverine can take it. And now he’s coming up to get each and every one of you bastards.

  11. CAM CAM says:

    Yup, that shot of Wolvie is my single favourite panel of all time I think, and my go to example when people ask about John Byrne art.

  12. sitara119 sitara119 says:

    ah, back when xmen was good.

  13. T.G.Rogers T.G.Rogers says:

    “Nuff said!!!!”
    Why isn’t that on the last page of EVERY comic?

  14. reg5000 reg5000 says:

    I do love that image. The defining Wolverine moment.

  15. vadamowens vadamowens says:

    It was just after this page that I quit reading. I can’t handle the older style writing. It’s just not for me.

  16. powerdad powerdad says:

    I see a lot of shout outs for John Byrne (and as a life long Byrne fan, I agree), but don’t forget to give Terry Austin some love here too as the inker. They made quite the team in those days, and Austin really brought out the details of Byrne’s drawings.

    (I hate to say it, but I don’t know who did the colors. I own this issue and amazingly kept it in good shape of all things), but am too lazy to get it out to find out the colorist.)

  17. Coincidentally I just bought this book the other day! Sniktity snik!