Comic Book Casting: SAGA Live-Action Movie

SagaEvery Monday here at iFanboy, we look at comics’ greatest characters and stories and try to imagine what they’d be like in film or television. From the story concept to the people in charge and all the way down to who’d play who, we do it every Monday and we call it Comic Book Casting.

Last week, Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ comic series Saga reached its twelfth issue and along the way cemented itself as one of the most vibrant serialized stories on comic shelves in recent memory. Beneath its sci-fi exterior with TV-headed royalty, eviscerated ghosts and ray guns, it’s a very human story of two people from different parts of society who find love and fight all comers to stay together. Romeo & Juliet? Maybe. But Saga‘s got ray guns.

And given how some of of comics’ best books have been adapted to television and film and Vaughan’s own connection to Hollywood with his work on Lost and the upcoming Under The Dome series, it’s natural to think what a Saga film might look like. Would it be easy, given the massive special effects and unique sights Staples illustrates on every page? Perhaps. But we’ve seen bigger budgets go to worse stories. *cough* Avatar *cough*

Here’s how I’d do it.

The Concept:

As I said, the heart of Saga is a love story between Alana and Marko and them rearing their infant daughter Hazel. The struggle comes when their two races come to get them — sometimes its family, while other times its their political governments who blame them for a massacre that happened when they met. All in all the excellent makings for a great science fiction story with some heart.

And although Vaughn has been quoted as saying that Saga is “way too expensive to be TV and too dirty and grown-up to be a four-quadrant blockbuster,” I think with the right handling — between screenwriters, producers and director — it could be just the kind of sci-fi story movie house audiences would love to see.

The Director:

Every movie can’t be directed by a well-known, proven director; sometimes you have to take chances. For Saga, I’d take a chance with Rise of the Planet of the Apes director Rupert Wyatt. For those that’ve seen that film you might say that he’s more proven than not, but to the world at large the Apes franchise overshadows almost anyone who works in it. Wyatt’s currently doing a TV movie about the Culper Ring called Turn, but I’d love to see him return to the big screen and take on this ensemble story and make it live and breathe.

The Cast:

 Alana – Jessica Alba: Before you disagree with me on this, hear me out. Although Alba’s been in her fair share of comic films already — and hasn’t had carried a hit in over a decade — I think she would be a great choice to play Alana.  For one reason or another, Alba never seems to be able a juicy role of her own since the remake of The Eye. That film didn’t do much in the box office, but it showed me she’s more than just a pretty face and playing Alana could really surprise people AND be just the role this actress needs for her carer.

Marko – Joseph Gordon-Levitt: This was a remarkably tough job to cast; I had a number of television actors who’d be ideal for it, but in the realistic scope of thing you need someone with a bit more star power than any of those candidates… then I lucked upon Levitt. At first glance you might think he’s done more than his fair share of comic movies, but I think this is the exception. He can be strong and vulnerable, and would be an interesting person to play opposite Alba and hopefully bring more out of her than audiences are used to seeing.

Hazel – Carey Mulligan:  Imagine this — shrink her down to a baby’s size. Okay, maybe not. With this casting I intend Mulligan to be the voice-over of Hazel who narrates the book, and give the movie that something extra to tie it all together.

Prince Robot IV – Michael Fassbender: Call it type-casting given Fassbender’s great role in Prometheus, but however you slice it I think he would be excellent as Prince Robot IV. Although I’m a bit reluctant to cover up his star-worthy face, I think Fassbender could make it work and be a great villain with his own set of problems.

The Will – Joe Manganiello: To me, The Will is the Han Solo of Saga; a bit more rogueish than Han in the opening of Saga, but someone with a soft side  to compliment his hard exterior. I found out about Manganiello through True Blood, which both introduced him to the world but also criminally underused him. At one time he was in the running to play Superman, and their loss could be Saga‘s gain here. Manganiello could be the guy all other men want to be, and all the girls want to be with.

The Stalk – Mia Wasikowski: A hard character to put on screen, but I wouldn’t put it past some of the great special effects guru to take the character of the Stalk as a challenge and excel like you wouldn’t believe. To bring the character to life, Mia Wasikowski would be a great choice and would really take advantage of her blossoming skills and give her a role that’s a little darker than what people are used to seeing her in.

Izabel – Amber Tamblyn: Arguably one of the best characters in the Saga ensemble, I feel as if Izabel has a little bit more to show us as the series goes on. I’d chose young TV actress Amber Tamblyn to take on the role, giving her youthful exuberance free reign opposite Marko and Alana.

Gwendolyn – Jessica Lucas:  You think Scott Pilgrim has a problem with exes? Wait til you meet Marko’s, Gwendolyn. Jessica Lucas was great in the recently cancelled TV series Cult, but I first came to know of her out of her brief role in CSI. Between then and now she’s had roles in CloverfieldMelrose Place and last week’s Evil Dead and she seems like a future leading lady in her own right. Although Gwendolyn isn’t that role for Lucas, I’d love to see her come after Marko and Alana in Saga.

Barr – Harvey Kietel: Harvey Kietel may not be known for showing his softer side, but the one-time Bad Lieutenant would be great to play the role of Marko’s father and be that tough guy with a soft interior.

Klara – Tilda Swinton: Tilda Swinton as Klara — once I thought of it, I can’t get it out of my head. Especially her hard-nose antics when she goes planetside with with Marko.


Comments

  1. Brilliant. Agree with everything but Jessica Alba, just seems wrong. Like a Ben Affleck as Daredevil sort of wrong.

  2. i don’t see why SAGA couldn’t be made into a TV show. Surely it would be cheaper to make than something like Game of Thrones? Adapting most of the places we’ve seen so far would no different than producing Star Trek or Battlestar Galactica (i.e. Earth-normal outdoor backdrops and small indoor sets), and most of the props / weapons are simplistic plastic and wood designs rather than expensive metalwork. The only area of production I could see being expensive would be in makeup and costume design, but even then there are always cheaper workarounds for practical effects.

    • What about the Rocketship forest, dude with the giant ballsack, whore house with flying hookers or the planet that hatches into a baby? Me thinks you are underestimating that Saga budget a bit

    • I’m inclined to agree.
      @phess1 is right there are certain elements that would be tricky but if you toned those down a little and were slightly looser with the adaptation (not a bad thing in my book) you could have HBOs first, big, sci-fi series.
      As for the creatures just look at what the Jim Henson Company did for Farscape on a weekly bases, truly amazing stuff.
      Especially if it was a mini-series and not an ongoing I could see HBO doing something great with it.
      Or it could work as a low/mid budget feature, if you accept that you can’t work it as a four-quadrant blockbuster, aim for a hard-R rating and shoot it for around 30 million, if it was stylized and shoot digitally on greenscreen that could be achievable.

    • Considering what HBO does with Game of Thrones they would be the perfect network for that. Although to think that HBO and DC/Vertigo are owned by Warner Bro’s and they have never adapted anything from the comics is almost criminal in my book.

  3. Paul Montgomery Paul Montgomery (@fuzzytypewriter) says:

    Amber Tamblyn’s pushing 30 at this point, so she might be a bit out of range for Izabel. Otherwise some really strong choices. Particularly Mia Wasikowski, Carey Mulligan and Tilda Swinton.

  4. I wonder if Jessica Alba would be down for all the sex scenes, don’t think she’s ever done anything like that

  5. To me Marko is James McAvoy but JGL would be excellent as well!

  6. Ooh. Jessica Alba. That’s a tough choice to get behind. Lotta great choices on there, but that one… I don’t know, I see Alana as being a little more hard-edged– it’s fine if she’s pretty but she should be clever, tough, admirable, and brave first and foremost. Those are qualities that have to come across in the acting as much if not more than in the script.

  7. And just out of personal opinion I’d swap Alba for Aisha Tyler. Whether it’s because of their similar names or their passive-aggression, I don’t know, but whenever Alana speaks I can’t get Agent Lana Kane’s voice out of my head.

  8. John Lovitz as the voice of Lying Cat.

  9. You forgot to cast Ogredong.

  10. Jacen Chris Jacen Chris (@jcbhatestweeter) says:

    I don’t get how you didn’t see JGL as Marko. I feel like that’s who Staples is drawing. haha

  11. Fassbender could play every character in this series if were up to me. I do think he would make a better The Will though. Dont hide that face!
    Since you really could put any good body in for Prince Robot, I think Jared Harris would provide a nice voice for him. Eva Mendes for Alana. Totally agree on JGL though!

  12. rosario dawson or kerry washington for alanna

  13. Jessica alba god no

  14. I love Harvey Kietal and I wish he got more roles but I don’t see him as the dad. I feel like Tom Hanks to play the typical dad type role fits better. Love Alba though. Good thinking there.

  15. I disagree with almost all of these; and why are the leads white? Yea maybe it doesn’t matter and there’s make but still I just don’t imagine Marko and Alana that way when I read the book. I feel like for this movie (if/when it ever happens) it would probably need a ton of star power but it would diminish the viewing experience; do we want another “Hulk” or do we want a “Dredd”?

    I think Alana should be played by someone who can play a character with a hard edge occasionally, like Rosario Dawson or the lead from “Haywire”. I like JGL as Marko admittedly, but feel like there’s so many other guys who could come cheaper and bring that indie vibe I associate with the book like Anton Yelchin, Jamie Bell, etc (I wish I had more knowledge of more ethnic actors but those two are pretty great IMO). PRIV I see as someone who can be commanding but also very vulnerable in private or with his wife, some who comes across as insecure (Def not Fassbender); what about Billy Crudup or one of the older Stark brothers from GoT? Mia as the Stalk… No problem there since I loved her in “Lawless”. I won’t offer any more suggestions since the others are already giving me a challenge and they were the most important anyway.

    I disagree with Vaugn about “Saga” being too expensive for tv or too dirty for the movies. How many “unfilmable” films gave been made in the last 10 years? “Watchmen”, “Life of Pi”, “Avengers” (Come on, who said without a doubt it would be a success?); at this point calling something unfilmable is almost a challenge to any director to adapt it. Too much complex imagery for tv? Do what “Sanctuary” on SyFy does and use 100% green screen sets (the cast and crew said in interviews it was cheaper than building actual sets, and more environmentally conscious), or just trim down the imagery to manage it (GoT). Too dirty for the movies (Come on, what’s he comparing it too?) again tone down some stuff (only thing that comes to my mind is the giant Scotum, everything else has been done in R movies a 100 times over) or make it NC-17…What, this is a mature readers comic right? What couldn’t you do with that rating? Sky’s the limit as far as I know.

    • I agree with a lot of what you’re saying and it could lead to a great film but remember it also has to make money!
      The NC-17 is pretty much a death-rating in the US and simply won’t turn a profit for something of this scale.
      If my facts are up-to-date Dredd still hasn’t turned a profit (and it only had a mediocre budget) while I’m pretty sure Hulk did.
      If I’m right the Comic Book Casting articles are about speculating about what could work and not an impossible wish-list.
      I doubt any studio would greenlight an NC-17 or hard-R sci-fi film in this day and age, certainly not without MASSIVE star-power.
      As for your Watchmen example, people seem to forget that commercially that film was considered a flop.
      So yea, cool ideas but they wouldn’t happen in a million years.

    • K, can we agree that “Dredd” was leagues better than “Hulk”? My point was i’d rather see a great comic movie that doesn’t turn a profit than one that makes millions but sucks balls. “Watchmen” may have been a flop, but it was probably the king of “unfilmable” movies but got made anyway ( without making every aspect unrecognizable I might add). I’m 90% sure “Dredd” was made on a 8 million dollar budget, something like that. Why it failed I’ll never understand. We’re talking about having a movie make enough money but also having huge star power, couldn’t that eat up the budget and by extension the profits? I get that NC-17 might be a death sentence in the US, but what about world wide? Surely a good chuck of profits can come from that? In this day and age, studios are gonna have to learn to take chances on films that aren’t reboots, remakes, or old movies with a different title (it could take decades but it has to happen eventually).

      And I know that these articles are meant to be “realistic”, but they still don’t have a high chance of happening so they are pretty much “fantasy”. In today’s case, it was one I wouldn’t want to swallow.

    • @ithosapien: It’s a litte weird that you complain all the proposed leads are white and then mainly propose other white actors. Also, Jessica Alba is half Mexican so calling her white isn’t exactly accurate.

      I also agree with @kzap that some of your examples aren’t very persuasive as both Watchmen and Dredd were huge flops. And despite some people disliking them, both Hulk films made over $100 million in profit. I also agree with kzap that we’re unlikely to see a hard-R sci-fi film green lit as so many recent R sci-fi films have been failures.

    • First of all the reported Dredd budget was $40 million, which doesn’t include marketing or advertising. Also, wanting to “see a great comic movie that doesn’t turn a profit more than one that makes millions but sucks balls” is an understandable sentiment, but ultimately leads to less comic movies. I want great comic movies too but filmmaking is a business for the studios that pay for the films so if they don’t make money they are going to stop making them.

      Also, worldwide profits are not typically something a studio can rely on because often, even for a successful movie, overseas profits aren’t high enough to be worth the trouble. Localizing, translating, and subtitling a film is not cheap. They certainly make money but usually not enough to save a film that has flopped in it’s home country.

      And if you think studios need to stop make films that are reboots and based on franchises you should probably look at the top grossing films of 2012. The top 7 were all reboots, remakes, sequels, or franchises based on books.

    • “Also, worldwide profits are not typically something a studio can rely on because often, even for a successful movie, overseas profits aren’t high enough to be worth the trouble. Localizing, translating, and subtitling a film is not cheap. They certainly make money but usually not enough to save a film that has flopped in it’s home country.”

      That’s actually not true anymore. Most big Hollywood blockbusters make most of their money from outside the US now and the studios are starting to act accordingly (i.e. the changes made to IRON MAN 3 to make it more China-friendly). Many films have had sequels greenlit because, despite middling US box office, they’ve been monsters overseas.

    • ” I like JGL as Marko admittedly, but feel like there’s so many other guys who could come cheaper and bring that indie vibe I associate with the book like Anton Yelchin, Jamie Bell, etc (I wish I had more knowledge of more ethnic actors but those two are pretty great IMO).”
      Jesus @Uspunx, can you at least read my whole post before tearing into holes of logic?
      “And despite some people disliking them, both Hulk films made over $100 million in profit”. Then why was the second a reboot and the third movie being stalled? Wloverine made money too, and that sucked as well.Money is not everything, or at least what shouldnt ALWAYS matter. We’ll get dozens of Avengers-related movies in our lifetime, does every comic book movie have to be a multi-million dollar blockbuster?
      “And if you think studios need to stop make films that are reboots and based on franchises you should probably look at the top grossing films of 2012. The top 7 were all reboots, remakes, sequels, or franchises based on books.” How many of those were good, objectively speaking? And when did I say anything about sequels or franchase movies? COME ON!! I was talking about movies being made that are basically the same plotwise as a movie made 20 years ago with a different title. Happens more than you think.

      @Conor Kilpatrick, thanks for the back-up. Overseas can mean the difference between a movie being a success and one of the top 10 highest grossing movies of all time.

    • @conor: Really? I had no idea, I missed all the stuff regarding IM3’s changes. Thanks for the info, @ithosapien I stand corrected.

    • @ithosapien: So you complain about all the suggestions for the leads being white (which they actually weren’t) but then you say you wish you knew more ethnic actors so that then makes it okay that all your suggestions were also white? What logic am I missing?

      My point with the Hulk films is that even though they were critically disappointing and most comic fans didn’t like them, they still made money. Enough for two, and possibly a third, to be made. Where Dredd received good reviews by both fans and critics but it has already been stated by the producer that a sequel is very unlikely because of how little money it made. My point there was movies have to be good and make money. Saying you just want them to be good but don’t care if they are successful will lead to less comic book or sci-fi movies being made. And yes Wolverine did suck, but because it MADE MONEY we are getting a second one. I’m not saying this is a good system but it’s how films are made.

      Good is not an objective thing. Sure there are some movies that I think are obviously crap, like Wolverine and the Hulk, make a lot of money so clearly someone thinks they’re good. Rarely is it black and white. Even movies as popular as The Dark Knight and The Avengers had their detractors. @kzap and I have had several discussion about what we both qualify as “good” films. Asking which were “good objectively speaking” is an impossible question to answer. But you asked to here goes: 1) The Avenger’s 2) The Dark Knight Rises 3) The Hunger Games 4) Skyfall 5) The Hobbit 6) Breaking Dawn Part 2 7) The Amazing Spider-Man. I have seen the first 5 and I would say I thought they were all very good. I haven’t seen any Twilight films or ASM so I don’t have an opinion on those. How about you? You asked how many were good? What do you think of those? I liked 5 out of 7 which is 71%. I’d say that’s a pretty good percentage of “good” films.

      I also don’t know how to respond to this: “I was talking about movies being made that are basically the same plotwise as a movie made 20 years ago with a different title. Happens more than you think.” What movies are you referring to? There is an often quoted maxim that there are only 7 types of stories in fiction so maybe you’re referring to that?

    • @conor: That was an awesome article! Thanks for sharing that. I really had no idea international box office accounted for such a large percentage of U.S. film revenue these days. Based on that article, have there been films that have bombed here but had sequels green lit based on their international performance?

    • Christ I don’t feel like doing this today.
      “So you complain about all the suggestions for the leads being white (which they actually weren’t) but then you say you wish you knew more ethnic actors so that then makes it okay that all your suggestions were also white? What logic am I missing?”. The guy who wrote this article clearly knows actors, I myself being younger and having specific tastes in movies don’t. It’s too much to ask he find actors who aren’t caucasion and not obivious casting choices for Studio execs to put in movies? Be more creative! Jessica Abel doesn’t not look like Alana at all, but with latex or dark foundation could. Why not give a lesser known actress a chance who otherwise might not get a starring role every 2 years? I suggested actors I know, the list is short; the guy who put this list together couldve been more creative IMO.

      “My point with the Hulk films is that even though they were critically disappointing and most comic fans didn’t like them, they still made money. Enough for two, and possibly a third, to be made. My point there was movies have to be good and make money.” Uhhh, one was terrible and got a sequel and the other was good and did not get a sequel.” And yes Wolverine did suck, but because it MADE MONEY we are getting a second one. I’m not saying this is a good system but it’s how films are made.” This is how crappy movies are made you mean, as long as something makes money I guess it’s existence is justified. Maybe it is, IDK.

      1) The Avenger’s: Good. 2) The Dark Knight Rises: Great. 3) The Hunger Games: Didn’t see it. 4) Skyfall: Great. 5) The Hobbit: Excellant. 6) Breaking Dawn Part 2: part of the worst franchase in history!!!! 7) The Amazing Spider-Man: boring, but 60/40 liked it so there. I think we can objectively determine if something is good, or does everyone on this site have different views on hundreds of books but never disagree about it? If we can do that for comics, shouldn’t be a leap to do it for movies. Yea fine, we disagree on if we like it but it should’nt be hard to decide if it’s a good movie. You admitted that the first Hulk and Wolverine movies were crappy, so what you didn’t like them but they were good movies?! GTFO if you say “Yes” to that. We can determine if something is objectively good, it just takes time and dialogue.

      ” There is an often quoted maxim that there are only 7 types of stories in fiction so maybe you’re referring to that?”. No that is not what I’m talking about. I’m talking about a remake that has a different title than the movie it’s based on. An old movie made with new actors, new special effects, and passed off as a entirely new film when just recycles one from 20-30 years ago. I don’t know how to be any clearer. I’m not gonna make a list because there’s too many to do so and I’ve ignored/suppressed them and forgotten. If you have to have an (NOT PERFECT!!!!!!) example “Avatar” might count; it was pretty much “Pocahantas”, “Dances with Wolves”, and “The Last of the Mohicans”. That is not what I would use to describe what I’m talking about but it’s the only thing I can name right now. If you still don’t understand, I can’t help you. Don’t bring up this last point if you can’t because I’m gonna try to explain it anymore.

    • Wow this conversation has took off since I was last online.
      It looks like USPUNX has said a lot of what I would have but I’d just to drop my two-cents in again:
      Like I said at the start I agree with IthoSapien that a lot of those things would make a film good and I’d rather see a film I enjoy than a film that’s commercially successful, Scott Pilgrim springs to mind.
      BUT studio would NEVER green light a film if they don’t think it will make a profit, no matter how much fans or critics would like it, that’s just bad business.
      So when hypothesizing about films I like to imagine something that might one day get green lit.
      As for your theory about Hollywood reusing stories, they’ve been doing that far longer than you might think.
      Think of the film “The Maltese Falcon”, now chances are you’re thinking of the 1941 Humphrey Bogart film.
      What you may not know is that film is a REMAKE and it’s based on a book. In fact it was the third film to come out based on that book in a 10 year period! And people rightly consider it a classic, originality has nothing to do with quality.
      If you’re interested in this sort of thing I’d highly recommend watching “Everything is a Remix Part 2” on youtube.

    • And just to way in on those top 7 films.
      1) The Avenger’s: Great fun. 2) The Dark Knight Rises: Good but Nolan can do better. 3) The Hunger Games: Pleasantly surprised, looking forward to sequels. 4) Skyfall: Fantastic 5) The Hobbit: Underwhelming, over-padded, I’ll probably enjoy it more on re-watch though. 6) Breaking Dawn Part 2: Calling it the “worst franchise in history” is hyperbolic but I certainly wouldn’t call it “good” 7) The Amazing Spider-Man: I really enjoyed it, almost as much as Raimi’s first film but in very different way, it felt like the studio had tampered with it a bit.
      So for me that’s 5/7 (although The Hobbit certainly wasn’t “bad”) which is a good year actually, I think I tend to disagree with the mainstream consensus on film a little more than that, I can’t sit through any of the Transformers films for example.

    • I’d quite like to pick up on this point actually “does every comic book movie have to be a multi-million dollar blockbuster”.
      No and hopefully we’ll see more smaller comicbook flicks in the future.
      We’ve already had some like A History Of Violence, Ghost World and Road to Perdition and while two of those had decent budgets and made a sizable amount in return I wouldn’t call them “blockbusters”, they’re certainly not the fabled four-quadrant movies.
      Neither was Dredd or Scott Pilgrim, although those may have been aiming for blockbuster status.
      We’ve also got a Criminal film coming up, which I’m really interested to see and there are a few lower budget super hero flicks out there like Chronicle (which I’ve yet to see).
      With all of that said, if it’s an adaptation of something from either DC or Marvel chances are they will be aiming for a blockbuster, simple because of the companies who own the rights.
      And when it comes to other material the cost of an out-side studio purchasing the right and development costs, means they’re likely to want to do something big with it, but it depends on the property.

    • @ithosapien: I’ve clearly offended you again so I’ll just say I’m sorry and add that I agree with pretty much everything @kzap said here.

    • @Kzap, “Chronicle” was pretty good, Not excellant, but well done IMO. However it wasn’t based on a comic BTW.

      I’m having a hard time listing comic book movies that weren’t trying to be blockbusters, probably because most of them are action/Super-Hero based which reflects on their expectations. Does anybody want to look up how “Wanted” performed? “Kick-Ass” was pretty successful. “Surreogates” was a flop in every sense I believe. Don’t know how “Red” or “the Losers” actually performed. The “Swamp Thing” movies had cult status (or at least the first one) I heard.

      Maybe the key is to push properties that are not super hero titles. Although with the freedom/lack of restrictions on the medium, maybe the most popular stories would be the hardest to put on the screen (“The Sandman”). Push stuff that’s more human, more drama based (“Y the Last Man”, “Life Sucks” , shoot this another hard list to put together). Although those type of stories might be hard to find a studio to finance and then they get a too small budget and are DOA.

      Ohh, “The Crow”. Not really a super hero movie IMO, and the first one is phenomial. Maybe thats a good middle ground.

    • @ithosapien: Hey, I came back to this thread this morning and reread our discussion and I’m just curious where things went wrong. What did I say that set you off? I’m genuinely curious as this is not the first time one of our discussion has quickly turned into an argument. That was not my intention and rereading my posts I don’t feel as if I was really attacking you so I’m just curious what it was.

    • Did this turn into an argument?
      I’m not the best at picking up on social cues (especially online) but I’ve been writing under the impression this was a discussion all along. If I’d known this was an argument I’d have broken out the “yo momma” jokes and started quoting Shakespeare “thou art as loathsome as a toad”.
      😛

    • Ha! Nothing like Shakespeare to take an opponent down a few notches!

      Maybe I’m the one who misread the cues but it seemed as if ithosapien was responding to my comments with a bit of ire. Again, probably my misreading.

      “Thou art a villan!”

  16. Funny that this article showed up today. Just last night I was telling my wife that, while stories like Locke & Key and Morning Glories seem like they’d be monster hits on screen, Saga (which we both love dearly) seems like it wouldn’t make the transition as well. I think Saga is and should remain a comic book. That being said, outside of Alba (who seems like a visual casting decision only) almost makes me want to see it.

  17. lying cat?

  18. Rosario Dawson has always been the first actress I think of as playing Alana.

  19. A Saga film will only work with unknown actors. This isn’t like The Walking Dead book where all the characters have generic faces.

  20. Fassbender as Primce Robot works so well it’s insane. I’d definitely watch him walk around a whole movie with a TV on his head.

    The rest are good too. Alba as Alanna raises an eyebrow, but I think she could pull it off. She did do a really good job in Sin City.

    • Hmmm, good point, I forgot she was in Sin City. Plus she is a mother so she could pull on her actual maternal instincts.

  21. Here here for Jessica Lucas as Gwendolyn.