REST from Milo Ventimiglia and Top Cow, To Be Developed by NBC

The concept is a simple and sellable one.  John Barret gets involved with a testing program for a new drug that eliminates the need for sleep. Something goes wrong, he gets hooked, and conflict ensues.

NBC is going to develop the property for a television series

It has been a circuitous route for Rest. Originally, it was a feature script by Mike O'Sullivan, then it was developed into a comic book series by Divide Pictures, which is Milo Ventimiglia (Heroes) and Russ Cundiff, with Mark Powers. That series was published by Devil's Due, and then the collection was published by Top Cow.  Now, the series has been tapped for development, with Ventimiglia and Cundiff attached as executive producers, as well as EP credits for Top Cow's Marc Silvestri and Matt Hawkins.  Finally, the pilot will be written by Philip Levens (Smallville), also an executive producer.

You're probably wondering about some things.  First, why, if I've never heard of this comic is it a big enough deal to get a TV series?  Second, what's the deal with Milo Ventimiglia and his name on comics?  These things are related. The fact is, Milo's name on the masthead of a comic probably doesn't move all that many more units than if it wasn't there.  It might bring in some more people to signings at comic shops, and sell a few more books, and maybe even make it slightly profitable.  But that's not why it's there.  If celebrity names sold comic books, we'd still see Adam Brody and Rosario Dawson's name on books.  What Milo does have, however, is relationships.  He was on a fairly successful show for a long time, and the people at NBC know that.  Add in a comic book company like Top Cow, with a proven track record of developing TV and Film properties, and you end up with a deal.  NBC doesn't care how well the comic book sold.  Even the best selling comics don't have an audience big enough to rate a series on the smallest of cable networks.  They don't know or care anything about the comics industry.  But they see Milo Ventimiglia's name across the top of a comic book (still the it source for development), and they think, "hey, we've got something here!"

This isn't a comment on how good the comic book is.  It might very well be a fantastic comic book, but the truth is, the way comics companies stay afloat these days is by thinking bigger than just pages.  If they didn't do that, there would be a lot less comics out there, because that's how things get paid for. Did you see all the names 2 paragraphs up?  Very few comic books are going to generate enough revenue to pay that many people anything significant.  But TV money?  That's a whole different ballgame.  For now, at least.

Since no one will say it, I would also like to comment that this is a really well designed cover.

Comments

  1. ActualButt ActualButt says:

    Well designed, yes, but mediocre job on the illustration and photshopping.

  2. Josh Flanagan josh (@jaflanagan) says:

    Feel better?

  3. Slockhart Slockhart says:

    So it’s a comic about David Prager?

  4. ed209AF ed209AF says:

    sounds like it could be half decent in either format, comic or tv.  would i spend 2.99/3.99? doubt it, my pull is full enough. would i watch it for free from my couch, much more likely

  5. mrlogical mrlogical says:

    Several comics have featured ads for the collected edition of this book lately, and while something about the design of the cover and the book have grabbed me every time, seeing Milo Ventimiglia’s name on it has has made me say "oh, nevermind."  I suppose that’s unfair, given that a)he didn’t write or draw the book and b)Umbrella Academy proved to me that a celebrity name being attached to a book doesn’t mean it can’t be awesome.  Something about Milo just strikes me as more Tyrese Gibson than Gerard Way.  But I like the concept, so maybe I’ll check it out at some point.

  6. ActualButt ActualButt says:

    As an artist and graphic designer, I love the parade of figures in the bottom third of the cover, but the whole thing looks like painted Liefeld "art". The concept sounds cool though, and I would definitely check out a show.

  7. ActualButt ActualButt says:

    The logo for the title is pretty sweet too.

  8. KickAss KickAss says:

    @Josh – See, right there.  He comments on how he doesn’t like the art here, insulting it for its "photoshopping" look.  And Josh immediately gives him crap for it.

    Though Conor throws this same insult about comics and their creators on mulitple occasions, calling their art laughably bad for the "Photoshoppy" look.

    So he gets to rant about this at all times, yet now Josh asks for the opposite, and mocks others for following Conor’s example?  Is this not clear cut hypocrisy?

  9. Josh Flanagan josh (@jaflanagan) says:

    @ActuaButt – I was commenting on the design/logo more than the artwork itself. Hence the specificity.

  10. ActualButt ActualButt says:

    @Josh – Gotcha. I agree.

  11. ActualButt ActualButt says:

    And sorry for the negativity…

  12. Josh Flanagan josh (@jaflanagan) says:

    We’re having an internet bro-hug moment.

  13. stuclach stuclach says:

    Get a (chat) room.

  14. PotatoPope PotatoPope says:

    The first issue was really good, but hit some publishing problems from DDP.  Looking forward to getting the whole series.

     Milo and Divide Pictures help produce comics that they think can have an impact on larger or various markets.  Look at Berserk, I would play a video game based on that property in a heart beat. 

    Comment about the art – Haven’t we all learned not to judge a book by its cover yet?

  15. Chris Rohling Anson17 says:

    It’s funny that Kick-Ass is never around when people have an intelligent conversation and discuss what they disagree about after the initial knee jerk reactions. It’s funny, because they always prove him wrong.