Comic Shots: Supernatural Comics and Ommegang

Each week the iFanStaff passes along a tasty drink recipe and an even tastier comic book recommendation. The cocktail (or beer, or wine, or booze) and the comic can both be enjoyed independently, but they have a common theme and when served together they can make for the perfect reading experience.


I’ve been reading a lot of different comics and drinking a lot of different beers this summer. But for the life of me I haven’t really found great pairing for Comic Shots. So I’m going to borrow an idea from iFanboy Senior Staff Writer and Director of Enthusiasm Mike Romo and do this Grab Bag style. To keep with Comic Shots tradition, I’m going to try to stick with a bit of theme for my comics and brews

The Beers

Ommegang, a great brewer out of Cooperstown, NY, has become a recent favorite of mine. Their name is a recent regular at most of the bars I go to–at least one of their beers will be on tap and there are usually a couple more in bottles. And they always, without fail, hit the proverbial spot.

Ommegang Witte

Witte was my beer of the summer. It’s on tap almost everywhere I go and beer’s citrusy and spicy flavor is perfectly refreshing on a hot summer day. The brew even has a hazy, clouded look to it, which is a bit too on the nose for New York City’s infamous hazy, hot and humid summers.

Talking about this beer always ends up sounding like the “Who’s on First” sketch. Ommegang brews their Witte in the traditional Belgian-style for wheat ales (witbier), which in addition to a large proportion of wheat includes orange peel and coriander. But the name Witte comes for the Flemmish word for “white” not wheat. It’s called a white beer for that cloudy look the brew has; the Wheat, White, Witte thing is just bonus alliteration. Similar in taste and name to Ommegang Witte, is the incredibly delicious Allagash White.

Ommegang Abbey Ale

After a particularly rough day at the office, I was looking for something strong when I got home. Waiting patiently in my fridge was Ommegang’s Abbey Ale, a Belgian-style Dubbel. I like Dubbels because of their dark, malty flavors. They’re carmelly and rich and very comforting after a long day.

I asked Josh Christie, iFanboy Resident Beer Expert and Under-Secretary of Shenanigans, a little about the history of Dubbels (because I’m lazy and don’t like Wikipedia). They get their name, which unsurprisingly means “double”, from the extra amount of malt used. Further up the scale are Tripels, which have even more malt. The sugars in malts are what the yeast turns into alcohol during the brewing process. Therefore, more malt means a higher alcohol content, so be careful. Abbey Ale clocks in at a 8.5% ABV (alcohol by volume)–it’s not super high, but you should pace yourself. The last time I had a beer with that high an ABV–a tasty elixir called Delirium–I wasn’t paying attention and drank four of them. It was a regrettable evening. But that’s a story for another day.

The Comics

I few months ago I started watching the CW hit show Supernatural. If you’re not familiar with it, the series follows two brothers, Dean and Sam, as they drive across the country in their 1967 Chevy Impala solving weird mysteries and fighting demons. I fell in love with Dean Winchester the show pretty much instantly. And since then, I’ve been finding myself pick up comics with a supernatural twist to them. Here are a few of my recent favorites.

Mysterius: The Unfathomable

Written by Jeff Parker; Art by Tom Fowler
Published by DC Comics / Wildstorm

I picked this up at Emerald City Comic Con at Jeff Parker’s table. I mean, look at that cover. The beat-up pulpyness of it just screams at you to pick it up and flip through it. Like the cover promises, the book is a weird and wonderful adventure–from seances with millionaire socialites to satanic cult orgies to the demon-infested world of a not-quite Doctor Seuss. The surly and drunk Mysterius is supernatural “problem solver” for hire. After a seance takes a turn for the worse, he picks up scrappy reporter Ella to be his new “Delphi” (think the Watson to his Holmes). Creepy hilarity ensues. It’s a good fun read if you can find it.

 

Sparrow and Crowe: The Demoniac of Los Angeles

Written by Dave Accampo and Jeremy Rogers; Art by Jared Souza
Published by Hermes Press

Dr. Xander Crowe is a more likable character than Mysterius, and Sparrow is more seasoned (and exasperated) side-kick than Ella. But Sparrow and Crowe has a similar vibe Mysterius. A down-on-his-luck occult private detective, Crowe gets dragged (and punched) into doing an exorcism on a mob boss’ daughter. And the demon causing all the trouble is also responsible for some nasty stuff in Crowe’s past. So far there’s only one issue of this mini-series out, but I’m really looking forward to the rest of the story.

 

Rachel Rising

Written and drawn by Terry Moore
Published by Abstract Studios

Rachel Rising is one of those comics I look forward to every time it comes out. Terry Moore is a comics master. His storytelling, art, and pacing in this series has been pitch perfect. I’m always on the edge of my seat waiting for what comes next. Rachel, and now her best friend Jet, are both back from the dead. They’re both looking for answers in their small, quiet hometown. So far their only clues are a mysterious, trouble-making blonde and a creepy little girl (seriously, what is it about little girl ghosts/demons that make them so damn creepy?!). The pace is a bit slow, as is the shipping schedule, so this may be something that reads in trade, but it’s a fantastic horror/suspense comic.

 

What about you, iFanbase? What’ve you been reading and drinking this summer?

 


Ali Colluccio is the iFanboy Demolitions Expert with a knack for finding ghosts. She enjoys comics, cocktails, and curling.

Please obey the law and only drink if you are of age. Drink responsibly and never drink and drive. Buy the comics that make you happy and spread the love.

Comments

  1. Spoons Spoons says:

    Nice choices all around. I would put the Three Philosophers brew by Ommegang above their abbey ale but both are still solid choices. “Mysterious” is fantastic. A series I definitely wish I could get more of.

  2. Grandturk says:

    Not a Ommegang fan at all – of the beer. My summer home is up in Cooperstown so I’ve been to the brewery several times. Their best offering is a blue-cheese horseradish spread. Oh man, that is good! Also – the brewery is not actually in Cooperstown at all; much like Brooklyn (Utica) and Sapporo (Canada).

  3. lifesend lifesend says:

    With all these supernatural comics, I would have chosen Ommegang’s Hennepin, ’cause that beer is out of this world. On a hot summer day, there simply isn’t a beverage more refreshing. It’s like Gatorade for drunks.

  4. supersnac90 says:

    Abbey Ale is heavy for me, I can dig it but I can’t eat it with anything, which is kind of how I drink my beer. Rare Vos tends to be my choice. I had a bartender suggest Witte (I think) as a good option in a Black and Tan, it wasn’t bad but it’s been awhile since I have had.

  5. PraxJarvin PraxJarvin says:

    All good choices! Beer AND Comicswise. Hennepin tends to be my favorite of the lot, but I do enjoy the Abbey Ale. I do have a bit of a Belgian Beer bug, though.

    While the first time I read Sparrow & Crowe I was sitting on the steps in Union Square Park before a concert, the second time I read it, I actually ended up having a Maredsous Abbey Brune Ale. A lot like Ommegang’s, but with the quality not unlike velvet. I’m fairly big guy who can hold his beers, but I had two Maredsous’ while watching the OPening Ceremony of the Olympics and ended up being fairly buzzed.

  6. I always feel left out on theese articles because I’m not 21 and cant leagally consume alcholic drinks :( but good comic picks

    • kzap kzap says:

      I always forget the drinking age is 21 in the US, that always seemed really bizarre to me. Do people actually follow the law though? (I know in the UK most people are drinking by 16)
      It seems weird that in the US you can legally get married but not have a glass of champaign at your own wedding (in the UK you can get married at 16 but drinking laws only apply to BUYING alcohol and drinking it in pubs).

    • @kzap Most people don’t actually follow the drinking law and start sometime in high school, or around 16 years old. The difference is that most of these under-aged drinkers aren’t gonna drink any type of craft beer because all their friends want to do is take pulls of Smirnoff and drink Keystone Light.

    • Yea it is kinda of stupid law 18 you can go out and defend your country but cant drink resposibly, Im 20 years old for you guys to know and I’ll be 21 in March I’m getting married next month to my high school sweet heart and I cant even toast with her cause I can’t drink.

  7. SplifEOC SplifEOC says:

    For The last 3 week I have been jobless granted 2 days I spent traveling half way across the country but beyond that its given me time to catch up. I am up to date on Fury Max w/ Jack on the rocks Manhattan Project w/ Lone Star beer (should be a weirder drink) and began to dive into the Marvel Cosmic with Nova and Annihilation w/ a mixture of the two… not together. I also started Orc Stain last night feels like i should be taking acid but alas Lone Star (same could be said about Mysterius. That book was Amazing. BTW the move made me down grade my comics stash and thats one of the trades I kept great Book

  8. dkbrain dkbrain says:

    Rachel Rising has been excellent.